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NCFF and Napa County Five Year Plan

https://napafirewise.org/programs/ncff-5-year-plan/


SHARING THE RESPONSIBILITY

COMMUNITY + CITIES + COUNTY

NCFF 5-YEAR FUEL REDUCTION PLAN

YEAR ONE ($5,400,000)

  • Angwin: roadside fuel reduction work. ($1 million) Clearing vegetation along roadsides for enhanced safety of evacuees and the ingress of first responders is one of CAL FIRE’s top priorities for vegetation management. The LNU Lightning Complex and Glass fire were both deemed natural disaster areas. With expedited CEQA analysis, NCFF could start work of fuels treatments. Napa Firewise has mapped these qualified roadways to begin obtaining landowner approval for work once funding is obtained. This project will be started from April to June 30, 2021.

  • Subdivision fuel break in the Circle Oaks community ($1 million) Circle Oaks experienced two near-miss fires in both 2017 and 2020. The fuel loading surrounding the subdivision and interior lands between the homes has not burned and treatments are desperately needed. This includes a large perimeter fuel break encompassing the Circle Oaks community. This project will be started from April to June 30, 2021.

  • Environmental studies ($400K) Fuel reduction projects are required to undergo large amounts of environment studies prior to work, California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), being one major component. The CAL FIRE Vegetation Treatment Programmatic EIR (Cal VTP EIR) streamlines analysis will be used, but even with this product, studies are conducted by private industry firm’s at large costs. NCFF would use leverage the Cal VTP EIR to facilitate CEQA review. This project will be started from April to June 30, 2021.

  • Angwin subdivision fuel breaks in the Linda FallsTerrace and Rancho Lajoita ($1 million) These two fuel breaks would provide greater opportunities for fire suppression on the South West slopes of Angwin. Any established wildland fire in these geographical areas will amount to catastrophic damage of the Angwin community.

  • Angwin subdivision fuel break along Pacific Union College Forest ridgeline ($1 million) The Pacific Union college owns 1,366 acres of forested land on the South Eastern side of Angwin. This rural town was narrowly spared during the 2020 Napa wildfires and is home to nearly 4,000 residents. Napa Firewise, Napa County Fire and CAL FIRE have identified this ridgeline fuel break project as a crucial defense mechanism in protecting Angwin from future wildland fires.

  • Subdivision fuel break in the Berryessa Highlands community ($850k) Berryessa Highlands was heavily impacted during the 2020 Lightning Complex and this region consists of steep slopes and grassy oak woodlands. The rapid fuel growth of annual grasses will present similar problems during fire season 2021. A subdivision fuel break is needed for the entire perimeter of Berryessa Highlands. With expedited CEQA analysis, NCFF would construct strategic fuel breaks to support fire suppression.

  • Silverado Country Club potential cost share grant. ($150k from NCFF for Potential Grant dollars) Silverado FSC is applying for grant funding to complete subdivision perimeter fuel reduction work. The Silverado Community was severely effected by the 2017 fires. The fuel loading above both the Highlands and Crest is once again an immediate threat to the entire Silverado community for this upcoming 2021 fire season. If grant dollars are unsuccessful, the project is estimated for $725K.

YEAR TWO ($9,965,000)

  • Roadside fuel reduction work ($2.7 million) Corridor clearing along the roadways designated as evacuation routes to provide life safety of resident evacuations and ingress of 1st responders. This project includes Napa County evacuation routes not completed in year one. Priority will be given to primary routes in hazardous areas. Secondary routes would then be tackled which include roadways exampled as: Mt. Veeder, Dry Creek, Soda Canyon, Steele Canyon and Atlas Peak.

  • Dry Creek/Mt Veeder: Fuel Reduction Maintenance ($650K) The south western hillsides of Napa County is home to the residents of Mount Veeder and Dry Creek communities. Napa Firewise has completed multiple roadside fuels treatments and strategic ridgetop fuel reduction projects that will need maintenance work. These fuel reduction projects have a 3-5 year lifespan before maintenance work needs to be addressed, otherwise dollars spent initially are ineffective against future wildland fires.

  • American Canyon eastern perimeter fuel break ($200K) Southern Napa County is surrounded by large acreage of open grass lands that pose great threats to residents in wind driven wildland fires. In 2019, a 526 acre fire displaced residents with evacuation orders. This fuel break along the eastern edge of communities will help protect the residents and support fire department resources with containment lines.

  • Angwin community fuel break from Friesen Lakes to White Cottage ($1 million) This fuel break protects the drinking water supply of Angwin and supports containment opportunities for fire suppression on the north west slopes of Angwin. Any established wildland fire in these geographical areas will amount to catastrophic damage of the Angwin community.

  • Sharp Road fuels treatment and infrastructure ($265K) Sharp Road is a critical connector from the Diamond Mountain community to Petrified Forest Road. This rural dirt road was a key component during the 2020 Glass Fire for residents to evacuate from Diamond Mountain and the ingress of fire suppression resources. This project needs expanded fuels reduction to protect citizens, and maintenance work of the road to create an all-weather surface for future use for what has become an important corridor.

  • Timberhill Park Fuel Break to Partrick Rd ($250K) Located in south west Napa County, these rural grasslands are adjacent to large residential communities with high fire danger. A wildland fire extending from this area will quickly threaten the Redwood Road and lower Dry Creek residents.

  • Calistoga – Old Lawley Toll and Diamond Mountain Road ($750K) These two northern Napa County communities have large amounts of dead standing fuel from the 2020 fires. This fuel reduction will reduce fuel loading against future fires and assist with safety of the residents against hazardous dead trees.

  • Deer Park – St. Helena Hospital fuel reduction ($3 million) The 2020 Glass Fire caused an evacuation and shutdown of Napa County’s northern hospital. Hospitals require extended amounts of time to carry out evacuations of their staff and non-ambulatory patients. The fuel in this area of Deer Park poses future threats of this healthcare facility. This work includes removing large amounts of dead standing fuels to help protect this infrastructure against future fires.

  • Veteran’s Home of Yountville fuel break ($750K) The western perimeter of the Veteran’s Home campus is greatly exposed to Napa County’s rugged steep hillsides of unmanaged vegetation. With vineyards to the north and south of the facility, a fuel break connecting these vineyards would help defend the Vets Home against future wildfire damage. The 2017 Napa fires threatened this resident population and evacuation warnings affected the 800+ Military Vets living on-site and associated staff workers. Holderman Hospital is also on the premises, providing medical care to the Veterans. The Veteran’s Home is considerably challenged in carrying out evacuations of this large-scale population including those non-ambulatory and elder aged.

  • Fire Safe Council CWPP specific projects ($300K) The twelve Fire Safe Councils under NCFF all contain individual Community Wildfire Protection Plans, aside from our recently completed Napa County-Wide plan. These individual protection plans include granular projects that identify wildfire risks within these populated communities. While larger landscape fuel reduction measures are taking place, this money will fund local level fuel reduction projects within these smaller communities.

  • Environmental studies ($100K) Fuel reduction projects are required to undergo large amounts of environment studies prior to work, California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), being one major component. Once the Cal VTP EIR has been used to streamline the CEQA process, project-specific analysis may be required (bird and native plant surveys, for example).

YEAR 3 ($9,650,000)

  • Wildhorse Valley to Skyline Park fuel break ($750K) The Wildhorse Valley area outside of Coombsville experienced an isolated wildland fire in 2008 that spanned over 4,000 acres. This area was once again damaged in 2017 by the Wine Country fires. A fuel break extending from Wildhorse Valley to Skyline Park will help assist in minimizing the spread of future fires and protect residents during evacuations.

  • Maintenance of strategic dozer lines in Napa County ($1million) Napa Firewise has consulted with CAL FIRE and mapped strategic dozer lines used during historic wildland fires in Napa County. These identified access points and containment lines require maintenance to ensure effectiveness against future fires. Dozer lines can also be connected to appropriate county roads, and limited access roads.

  • Shaded fuel break Circle Oaks to Wooden Valley ($2 million) The perimeter fuel break placed around the Circle Oaks community in year one, is only one piece of the fuel reduction plan needed to protect these residents. The landscape along Hwy 121 to the north, from Wooden Valley road leading up to Circle Oaks, contains a steep dense fuel loading of unmanaged vegetation. A shaded fuel break of this land would require creating vertical and horizontal separation of the overgrown fuels. The understory would need cleared and removed to reduce the rapid-fire growth that would occur.

  • Deer Park Community Fuel Reduction ($3 million) Expanded fuel reductions of the greater Deer Park community would entail removing dead standing fuel left behind from the 2020 Glass Fire. This project encompasses managing new growth and dead fuels among this area, especially in large parcels, to prevent widespread fire growth experienced in 2020.

  • Fuel break and fuel reduction work in the Pritchard Hill area extending through Foss Valley ($2.5 million) Pritchard Hill, located off Hwy 128 near Lake Hennessey, extends south to the top of Soda Canyon in Foss Valley. The Foss Valley exits onto the upper end of Atlas Peak Road and then travels across open lands to the Circle Oaks subdivision. The recent 2020 LNU Lightning Complex burned through this upper region extensively, but CAL FIRE used this area from Pritchard Hill to Circle Oaks in order to keep the fire progression from burning into Staggs Leap, Silverado Trail, lower Soda Canyon, lower portions of Atlas Peak and safeguard the Circle Oaks community. Our focus of work would concentrate in fuel reductions of the Pritchard Hill region to strengthen this containment line against future fires.

  • Fire Safe Council CWPP specific projects ($300K) The twelve Fire Safe Councils under NCFF all contain individual Community Wildfire Protection Plans, aside from our recently completed Napa County-Wide plan. These individual protection plans include granular projects that identify wildfire risks within these populated communities. While larger landscape fuel reduction measures are taking place, this money will fund local level fuel reduction projects within these smaller communities.

  • Environmental studies ($100K) Fuel reduction projects are required to undergo large amounts of environment studies prior to work, California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), being one major component. Once the Cal VTP EIR has been used to streamline the CEQA process, project-specific analysis may be required (bird and native plant surveys, for example).

YEAR 4 ($8,550,000)

  • Mt Veeder Fuel Reduction Work ($3 million) These two projects start at the Sonoma County line in Mount Veeders ridgetop areas of Trinity Road and Mt Veeder Road to Dry Creek Road, and Cavedale Road to the east. The rugged terrain of this Napa County region (Hog Back Ridge, and Mt Veeder Peak Ride) provide very few access points to prevent further southern progression of an established fire. Completing these fuels reductions initiatives enable success of containing a fire smaller in size by establishing west to east fuel reduction containment lines.

  • Spring Mountain Road expanded roadside fuels reduction ($2 million) This expanded fuels reduction project follows the Spring Mountain Road at the Sonoma County line and continues to the City of St. Helena border. This project creates a fuel reduction line from the western ridgetop to the valley floor. Also synergistic of a fuels reduction project scheduled in year five along the ridgetop to the north.

  • Berryessa Estates maintenance of fuel breaks ($1.5 million) Located in northern Napa County, this community of 200 homes is accessed by a single ingress/egress route over 5 miles long (Snell Valley Road). The 2020 fires burned aggressively up to the subdivision perimeter where fire suppression resources used existing fuel breaks to keep the fire from entering the central subdivision. These strategic fuel breaks will remain in a maintenance cycle for future use.

  • Napa County evacuation roadside maintenance from year one. ($1 million) Remove fuel loading along these egress and ingress routes especially along Highway 121 and 128, especially near Robert Louis Stevenson State Park and Petrified Forest Road. This fuel reduction provides safety of the evacuees and first responders. Maintenance cycle from work completed in year one.

  • Maintenance of Silverado Country Club perimeter fuel reduction. ($500K) Completing this project in year one places this project in a three-year maintenance cycle to ensure vegetation fuels remain cleared for this community of approximately 1,000 homes.

  • Maintenance for Berryessa Pines subdivision ($150K) This northern Berryessa subdivision of approximately 80 homes was impacted by the 2020 LNU Lightning Complex. Historical fuel breaks and firefighting efforts spared most of the homes from damage. The maintenance of these perimeter fuels is imperative for this neighborhood’s resiliency against fires.

  • Fire Safe Council CWPP specific projects ($300K) The twelve Fire Safe Councils under NCFF all contain individual Community Wildfire Protection Plans, aside from our recently completed Napa County-Wide plan. These individual protection plans include granular projects that identify wildfire risks within these populated communities, such as removal of dead standing fuels along Loma Vista Rd, which has experienced 3 fires in 5 years. While larger landscape fuel reduction measures are taking place, this money will fund local level fuel reduction projects within these smaller communities.

  • Environmental studies ($100K) Fuel reduction projects are required to undergo large amounts of environment studies prior to work, California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), being one major component. Once the Cal VTP EIR has been used to streamline the CEQA process, project-specific analysis may be required (bird and native plant surveys, for example).

YEAR 5 ($8,900,000)

  • Maintenance of Angwin perimeter fuel breaks ($1 million) Completing this project in year one places this project in a three-year maintenance cycle to ensure vegetation fuels remain cleared for this community.

  • Maintenance for Circle Oaks fuel break ($500K) Completing this project in year one places this project in a three-year maintenance cycle to ensure vegetation fuels remain cleared for this community

  • Maintenance for Berryessa Highlands fuel breaks ($500K) Completing this project in year one places this project in a three-year maintenance cycle to ensure vegetation fuels remain cleared for this community.

  • Maintenance of legacy fire roads and control lines of the 2017 Nuns Fire in western Napa County ($1.5 million) The rugged western hills of Napa County are densely overgrown and greatly challenge fire suppression efforts. The control lines and dozer lines along the western and northern boundaries utilized in the 2017 Napa Nuns fire and the Glass Fire require maintenance for future use.

  • Napa County evacuation roadside maintenance from year two. ($1.5 million) Remove fuel loading along these egress and ingress routes for safety of the evacuees and first responders. Maintenance cycle from work completed in year two.

  • Fuels reduction in Napa County lands of Calistoga ($2.5 million) This geographical area of Calistoga landscape has experienced three large catastrophic recent fires (2017 Tubbs, 2019 Kincade and 2020 Glass). Strategically, fuels reduction and maintenance is needed among the greater forested areas of: Robert Louis Stevenson, Franz Valley and Petrified Forest.

  • Ridgetop fuel reduction from Sharp Road across Diamond Mountain to the south ($1 million) This established fuel reduction work is situated along the Napa/Sonoma County line. Strategically placed for suppression efforts and fire impact along western hills of Hwy 29, south of Calistoga.

  • Fire Safe Council CWPP specific projects ($300K) The twelve Fire Safe Councils under NCFF all contain individual Community Wildfire Protection Plans, aside from our recently completed Napa County-Wide plan. These individual protection plans include granular projects that identify wildfire risks within these populated communities. While larger landscape fuel reduction measures are taking place, this money will fund local level fuel reduction projects within these smaller communities.

  • Environmental studies ($100K) Fuel reduction projects are required to undergo large amounts of environment studies prior to work, California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), being one major component. Once the Cal VTP EIR has been used to streamline the CEQA process, project-specific analysis may be required (bird and native plant surveys, for example).

***Disclosure: This guideline for NCFF’s 5-year fuel reduction plan is subject to change with consultation of the Napa County Fire Chief.

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